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DUNBARTON DICTIONARY

Your trusted partner for architects with complete opening solutions

Dunbarton has over 50+ years of helping architects get the job done to spec, and looking right. We embrace customized door and frame solutions to help you solve problems.

A B C d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
A

Access Door

A door with a four-sided frame installed above the finish floor that provides occasional access to a closet, storage compartment or mechanical space.

Accordion Door

A door with multiple hinged or pivoted door sections that collapse against one another or both upright jambs when opened. Track is fastened to a cased opening, no stop header.

Active Leaf

In a pair of doors application, the door in which the lock or operating hardware is installed. The inactive leaf is the other door of the pair and is normally held stationary by surface bolts or flush bolts.

ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act)

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) covers a wide variety of private businesses, as well as all the agencies of state and local governments. The ADA requires that these entities provide access to their programs, goods, and services. A standard set of guidelines for door openings are used to define and enforce the requirements for buildings to make the building easily accessible for people with disabilities. Some considerations are clear path of travel, ease of operation of hardware, specific direction for mounting heights of hardware, grab bars, sinks, and toilets.

Adjustable Frame (Dunbarton RediFlex)

  • Non Kerfed – A frame specifically designed to expand in width for various wall thicknesses. RediFlex frames has a single door section and 3 closure sections to fit walls from 4″ to 12- 1/4″. An adjustable frame can be assembled as a pre-hung unit with door and threshold
  • Kerfed – A frame specifically designed to expand in width for various wall thicknesses formed with a kerf to install kerf applied Q-Lon gasket. Kerf RediFlex series frame has a single door section and 6 closure sections to fit walls from 4″ to 12 1/2″. This type of frame can arrive at the jobsite pre-hung with jamb, door, hinges and weatherstrip.

Alignment

The proper positioning or state of adjustment of doors, frames and hardware resulting in uniform reveals and clearances and proper function of the door opening.

American National Standard Institute, Inc (ANSI)

Organization with the responsibility to create and manage standards of design and performance for manufactured products. Formerly known as ASA (American Standards Association).

Applied Trim

A decorative piece mounted to face of a frame or door, mostly made of wood.

Astragal

A piece of steel, aluminum or wood used to cover the gap between two doors hung in pairs at the meeting stile.

  • Flat Astragal – A one piece steel strip attached to one door and overlapping the other door when in the closed position. This astragal can be welded or attached with screws.
  • T Astragal – Usually made of steel with one leg between the doors attached to the active door and the other leg overlapping inactive door when closed. Usually applied to the secure side of the door to deter forced entry.
  • Flat Astragal – Astragal applied to the surface of one door and extending over the face of the opposite door to cover the gap
  • Z Astragal – Astragal that wraps around the complete edge and face of one door with a leg that extends over the surface of the opposite door
  • Combination Astragal with flush bolts – An astragal (either T or Z type in most cases) that has built in flush bolts and a strike preparation, so no additional preparation is required on the inactive door. Since this astragal is thicker than a T or Z astragal, the header width is normally increased to accommodate the thickness of the astragal between the doors
B

Backset

For the openings industry, this refers to the position of a piece of hardware in relation to a fixed point, either the edge or face of the door, or the face or stop on a frame.

  • Hinge Backset – refers to the measurement from the edge of the hinge leaf to the face of the door closest to the frame stop when the door is closed
  • Lock Backset – refers to the measurement from the latch edge of the door to the centerline of the cylinder or handle of the lockset or latchset
  • Exit Device Backset – refers to the measurement from the latch edge of the door to the centerline of the active case of an exit device. The backset of a vertical rod exit device determines the location of the strike.
    preparation on the frame. In some cases, the latch may not line up with the center of the operating hardware shown on the exit device template
  • Flush Bolt Backset – refers to the measurement from the meeting edge of the inactive door to the centerline of the flush bolt. Strike preparation in the header is based on flush bolt backset plus 1/8″ from centerline between the two doors of the pair

Barn Door

A sliding door that moves along a track mounted to the face of a frame or wall. In the open position, the barn door is parallel to the wall and reveals a cased opening frame in the wall.

Base

Material applied to a wall adjacent to the floor to cover any gap between the floor material and wall. Also provides a surface to facilitate cleaning and to protect the wall finish material from traffic damage.

Beveled Edge

A door edge that has been cut to create an angle less than 90º perpendicular to the door face. The industry standard for door bevel is 3º, or 1/8″ in 2″. Door beveling is required to prevent the edge of the door from contacting the frame when operated since the hinge pivot point is offset from the door face resulting in a slight projection of the door edge in operation.

Bi-Fold Door

Two doors connected with hinges that fold together in an opening. One door is pivoted at the frame head and the other door is hung on rollers in an overhead track. The track is mounted behind the stop of the frame toward the inside of the closet. The stop on the frame conceals the track and covers the space on each side. A four door bi-fold is similar except that it is made of two sets of two door bi-folds with each set opening toward the jamb on its side of the frame.

Bi-Pass Door

Two or more doors hung by rollers on an overhead track that slide past each other in an opening. In most cases, the frame is a cased opening frame with no stop. The track is supplied with a fascia to conceal the roller assembly and is fastened to the frame or to the structure at the header.

Blank Jamb

A vertical (upright) frame member that has no preparations for hardware in either frame rabbet.

Borrowed Lite

A glazed opening (window) in an interior wall.

C

Cased Opening

An opening in a wall that has been completed by applying jambs, casings, or other molding to create a finished appearance. Since there is no operating door, there is no need for a door stop in a true cased opening.

Casing

Molding used as a framing around a window, door, sidelight or borrowed light to conceal gaps or fasteners. Casing is sometimes referred to as “trim.”

Clearance

Door and Frame – The space between the edge of the door and the frame.
Frame and Wall – The space between the rough wall opening and the back of the frame.
Floor – The distance between the bottom of the door and the top of the flooring material. For fire rated openings, the maximum is ¾”.

Closed Section

A frame member without a throat opening such as a mullion or transom bar.

Closer

A hydraulic/mechanical device used to close a door with no assistance. A closer also provides control of the door while closing including back-check, sweep speed, closing force, latching speed and latching force. A door closer is distinguished from a spring hinge because it offers true door control as opposed to simply closing a door.

Caution: Closer vs. Closure
While they sound the same, these two items are completly different so be sure you are ordering the correct part! A closer prep is a reinforcement only while a closure is the backside of the RediFlex (RediFit, RediKit) frame.

Closer Reinforcement

Two or more doors hung by rollers on an overhead track that slide past each other in an opening. In most cases, the frame is a cased opening frame with no stop. The track is supplied with a fascia to conceal the roller assembly and is fastened to the frame or to the structure at the header.

Caution: Closer vs. Closure
While they sound the same, these two items are completly different so be sure you are ordering the correct part! A closer prep is a reinforcement only while a closure is the backside of the RediFlex (RediFit, RediKit) frame.

Closure Kit

Backside portion of the RediFlex (RediFit, RediKit) frame that completes the entire frame assembly.

Caution: Closer vs. Closure
While they sound the same, these two items are completly different so be sure you are ordering the correct part! A closer prep is a reinforcement only while a closure is the backside of the RediFlex (RediFit, RediKit) frame.

Cold Rolled

A process used to create the desired thickness on rolls of sheet steel while the steel is in solid form.

Communicating Door

A door comprised of two doors in one jamb allowing secure control of each door leaf by the occupant on the secure side of each door. If both occupants are in agreement, both doors can be opened to allow free passage between two rooms. Typically used in hotel suites.

Concealed Closer

A door closer that has the closing mechanism hidden from view by mortising into the top of the door or inside the door frame. The mechanism is not visible when the door is closed.

Concealed Stop/Holder

A stop or hold open mechanism mortised into the door and/or frame used to control the degree of opening of the door. The mechanism is not visible when the door is closed.

Coordinator

A device used to control the order of closing for a pair of doors. The device holds the active door in a position away from the jamb until the active door is closed. Closing the inactive door releases the coordinator allowing the active door to close.

Core

The material used inside a door panel to support the outer skin. The door core also may provide insulation, fire protection, temperature rise control, sound control and bullet resistance.

Corner Bracket

A device used in conjunction with a regular arm closer when to allow the closer body to mount to the frame and the shoe mounts to the door. This is required when other hardware, such as overhead stop/holders interfere with normal closer operation.

Concealed Vertical Rod Exit Device (CVR)

See “Exit Device – Mortise Vertical Rod”

Cylindrical Lock

A lock with working components encased in a cylindrical housing or is installed in a door using a round bore through the face of the door rather than a mortise in the edge of the door. The face bore is either 1 1/2″ diameter for cylindrical deadlocks or 2 1/8″ diameter for Grade 1, 2, and 3 cylindrical locks.

D

Deadbolt Lock

A locking mechanism that uses a solid bolt (deadbolt) that is extended into the strike using a key or thumb turn. Deadbolts are usually used for added security or as an auxiliary lock for doors that are normally unlocked during peak hours of building use.

Detail

Frame – Cross section drawings of frames and casings applied to a wall with all critical dimensions shown.

Plan – Cross section drawings of wall conditions and frame types shown on the construction plans. Plan details do not necessarily have all the critical dimensions shown and may be typical for different wall types and conditions.

Door Guard

A device installed on the interior of a door that, when engaged, allows the door to be opened slightly allowing the occupant of a room to identify the person outside the room. This apparatus provides security from forced entry but can easily be released to allow entry.

Door Holder

An apparatus installed on the floor or an adjacent wall that holds a door in the open position. Door holders can be mechanical or magnetically operated.

Door Light (Door Light Frame)

A glazed opening appearing in a door panel.

Double Rabbet Frame

A door frame that has a raised stop in the middle of the frame profile creating a rabbet for installation of a door on one or both sides of the jamb.

Door Stop

An apparatus installed on the floor or an adjacent wall that stops the swing of a door to avoid damage to the wall, furniture or other items. A door stop may also be equipped with a hold open mechanism (see Door Holder).

Double Acting Door/Frame

A door frame constructed with no stop on the surface to allow a door to swing in both directions. Special hardware is required (Double Acting Hinges, Pivot sets) that provides necessary support for the door when attached to the frame.

Double Acting Pivot

A piece of hardware used to support the door that allows the door to swing in both directions. The pivot is mounted in the center of the door and may be either centered in the frame or offset in the frame depending on its desired function.

Double Acting Pivot

A hinge mounted to a cased opening frame with two hinge barrels allowing the door to swing in both directions. The springs in the hinge barrels return the door to the middle (closed) position when the door is opened.

Double Egress Frame

A pair door frame fabricated with the doors in the center of the frame allowing each door to swing in opposite directions. Double Egress frames are normally used to control traffic flow and as fire barriers in case of emergency.

Double Rabbet Frame

A door frame that has a raised stop in the middle of the frame profile creating a rabbet for installation of a door on one or both sides of the jamb.

Drywall

Engineered sheets of gypsum attached to studs to form the actual wall surface. Drywall may be used as a fire barrier depending on the materials used.

Drywall Frame

A steel door frame that is designed to sleeve over a finished drywall partition (wall studs and gypsum wallboard) allowing it to be installed after the wall is completed.

Drywall Trim

A knob, handle, or lever attached to a door or panel that has no operating mechanism or latching capability.

Dust Box (or Dust Cover)

A box shaped attachment used with a lock/head strike that mounts behind the frame and protects the latching or deadlocking area from collecting debris.

Dutch Door/Dutch Frame

A Door and Frame combination that contains two door panels separated horizontally to form two separate operable leaves. In some cases, the lower leaf has a shelf attached to accommodate transactions between persons on each side of the door with only the top door section opened.

E

Edge

The vertical surface of a door perpendicular to the faces.

Edge Seam

The connection of the face sheet at the vertical edge of a steel door.

Edge Guard

A piece of formed metal applied to the edge of a door to protect the edge from impact from carts, gurneys, wheel chairs or other objects. Sometimes required on fire rated wood doors used in a paired opening.

Electric Hinge

A modification (additional holes) added to a standard hinge allowing the hinge to be used to transfer low voltage power from the wall to an electrically controlled apparatus on a door.

Electric Lock (or Electric Exit Device)

A locking mechanism that contains a solenoid used to lock or unlock the door opening allowing controlled access from a remote location.

Electric Strike

A strike for a lockset or exit device that can be operated from a remote location allowing the door to open without retracting the latching mechanism on the lock.

Electronic Power Transfer (EPT)

A device installed in a frame and door allowing electrical power to be transmitted from the wall to an electrified lock or exit device.

Elevation

An image of a door and/or frame appearing in building plans, shop drawings, or manufacturers’ drawings showing what a finished opening will look like. The elevation is usually a scaled drawing with critical dimensions shown.

Embossment

A process used in forming material, usually steel, that uses extreme pressure to modify the base material. Used for standard hinge and strike preps in frames.

Emergency Release (or Emergency Stop)

A specialized door stop normally used for private bathrooms in nursing or extended care facilities as part of a rescue hardware system. Under normal conditions, a door swings into the bathroom and is single acting except the door is hung on double acting pivot hardware. In case of emergency where the occupant has fallen against the door, the Emergency release is activated allowing the door to swing out of the bathroom and the patient can be easily accessed.

Escutcheon

A decorative plate used behind a lock cylinder, knob, handle or pull. The escutcheon may be used to conceal fasteners or provide lubrication for the knob or lever (see Rose).

Exit Device

A locking device for single or pairs of doors mounted on the surface of the door allowing egress through an opening in case of emergency. The device is operated by a push bar or push pad activated without turning a knob or lever. Four standard types are available:

  • Rim – Surface mounted on a single door or active door of a pair with the latching mechanism at the same height as the device and the strike is on the stop of the frame instead of the rabbet
  • Rim Vertical Rod (SVR)– Surface mounted on one or both leaves of a pair of doors with latching mechanism at the head and floor. The strike is mounted on the stop of the frame instead of the rabbet. In some cases, the bottom rod latching mechanism is omitted (LBR- Less Bottom Rod)
  • Mortise – mortised into the edge of a single door or active door of a pair using a traditional latch bolt in a strike plate on the frame rabbet
  • Mortise Vertical Rod (CVR) – mortised into the edge of one or both doors of a pair concealing the latching mechanism. The strike is mortised into the frame rabbet at the header

Exit Device Strike

Rim – Mechanism used to secure the bolt of a rim exit device. The strike is mounted on the stop of the frame. Frame requires reinforcement for mounting strike.
Mortise – Mechanism used to secure the bolt of a mortise device. The strike is mounted on the rabbet of the frame.

Existing Opening Anchor

A pipe sleeve, cylinder or other spacer located in the back of a hollow metal masonry frame used to secure the frame to an existing opening. This anchor is not usually used for new installations since standard anchors are concealed and the existing opening anchor is normally visible. Expansion bolts for masonry walls and lag bolts for wood stud walls.

F

Face

The component of a door or frame that is visible when viewing the opening straight ahead.

Filler Plate

A component of metal shaped to fit a hardware cut-out or emboss used to fill the hardware prep opening when the hardware is not used.

Finish

The material applied to a surface as a final covering or coating. This could be paint, clear coat, powder coat or other material that serves as the exposed surface for the material throughout its usable life.

Finish Hardware

Hinges, locks, door closers and other devices used to hang, lock, control and/or protect a door.

Finished Floor

The final material or coating placed on a floor. This could be concrete, wood, tile, marble, or carpet. When installing door frames, the ideal situation is to install over the top of the finished floor at the end of a project.

Finished Opening

An opening created in a wall of a structure that is completely finished and requires no additional trim, casing, or frame.

Fire Label

A Label placed on a door or frame that designates the fire rating qualifications of that component. The label defines the certification agency, fire test number the manufacturer of the product, size limitations and configuration. The label can be adhesive applied mylar, an embossment, or a metal label.

Fire Rated Door

A Fire Rated door is a door that has been tested and approved for use as a protective barrier in a fire rated opening. The fire door must have a visible label stating the fire rating and other installation requirements.

Fire Rated Glass

A glazing component of glass, ceramic or other material that has been tested and approved for use in a fire rated wall. All fire rated glass components must bear a fire label to qualify as fire rated glass.

Flat Head Screw

A threaded screw that seats into a countersink so the head of the screw is flush with the material being held in place.

Floor Anchor

A formed metal bracket used to anchor a jamb or mullion upright to the floor.

Floor Channel

An open channel applied to the floor used to attach a sidelight or borrowed light frame to the structure at the floor.

Floor Clearance

The measurement between the finish floor level and the bottom of a swinging door. Floor clearance allows the door to swing freely throughout its arc of travel.

Floor Closer

A hydraulic mechanism installed in the floor at the pivot point of a door to control opening and closing of the door.

Flush Door

A door with having no glass lights, panels, louvers or grilles.

Flush Bolt

A solid bar or rod used to fix the inactive leaf of a pair of doors to the floor and header of the door frame. Four common types are:

  • Manual: Corner Mounted at the top and bottom of a door with a mortise in the corner edge of the door. A manually operated lever moves the bolt into the frame header.
  • Manual – Extension: Mortised into the edge of the door at the top and bottom. A manually operated lever moves the bolt through a drilled hole in the door edge into the frame header
  • Automatic: Corner Mounted at the top and bottom of a door with a mortise in the corner edge of the door. A cam operated by the active leaf as it closes moves the bolt into the frame header
  • Self Latching Automatic: Corner Mount

Frame Face

The surface of a door frame visible when facing the frame perpendicular to the wall or door. For hollow metal frames, this is normally a 2″ wide surface surrounding the frame. For RediFrame, the face is the surface prepared for casing clips and installation holes. The RediFrame face without casing is 1 9/16″ wide.

French Door

A door with multiple panes of glass inside a surrounding framework of door stiles and door rails. 10 light and 15 light doors used in pairs are the most common application for French doors.

Full-Bound Frame

A four-sided frame prepared for a door commonly used as an access door. Consist of a hinge jamb, strike jamb, and two heads, one for top and another for the bottom of the frame.

Fusible Link

A soldered piece of metal (usually lead) installed in the operating mechanism of doors louvers, or hardware that melts as the temperature increases. When the fusible link melts, the mechanism is free to operate closing the opening as required by fire codes.

G

Guage

A standardized format used to measure and define the thickness or diameter of certain types of material, in our case steel thickness. For each gauge number designation, a corresponding thickness in inches or millimeters is defined. Some commonly used gauges in the door industry are:

  • 14 gauge .0747″ Heavy Duty Hollow Metal Frames and Doors
  • 16 gauge .0598″ Standard Hollow Metal Frames and RediFrame
  • 18 gauge .0478″ RediFrame
  • 20 gauge .0359″ RediFrame
  • 22 gauge .0299″ RediFrame casing

Galvanizing

The process of protecting steel by using zinc to reduce the production of rust (FeO2). There are two types of galvanizing processes in common use today for door frames.

  • Hot Dip Galvanizing – Steel is passed through a bath of molten zinc and where a coating is applied and then rolled onto the surface of the steel. Example: G90.
  • Galvannealed – This process is similar to the Hot Dip process except that the material contains some iron in addition to the zinc. The material is heated for a specific amount of time after the galvanizing process. This produces a much harder finish with much better coating adhesion. It is also much easier to weld if necessary. Example A40.

Gasket

A material placed around the head and sides of an opening to seal the space between a door and frame. The material may be rubber, silicone, PVC, plastic, metal, or fiber. The addition of door bottoms, sweeps, and thresholds completes the sealing process.

  • Smoke Gasket – used to prevent smoke from traveling through an opening allowing building egress in case of fire
  • Weatherstrip – used to prevent water and air from penetrating an opening saving energy cost.
  • Sound Seal – used to greatly reduce noise levels from one side of an opening to another. The amount of reduction in noise is measured and rated as the STC (Sound Transmission Coefficient) of an opening

Glass Area

The overall dimension of a frame that is to receive a piece of glass or ceramic glazing. The actual glass dimension is normally 1/4″ less in height and width. The visible light area is the glass area minus the height of the glass stops used to secure the glass in the opening.

Glass Opening

The finished opening where a piece of glazing is to be installed. The actual glass size is normally 1/4″ less in width and height of the Glass Opening.

Glass Stop

Steel, wood, or aluminum strips used to mechanically secure glass in a door or frame.

Glazed Opening

An opening in a door, frame, or wall that contains glass, ceramic, or other transparent or translucent material.

Glazing (Glass) Bead

Material used to form a seal between the glass and the stops on the frame or glass kit in a door.

Glazing Material

A glazing component of glass, ceramic or other material that has been tested and approved for use in a fire-rated wall. All fire-rated glass components must bear a fire label to qualify as fire-rated glass.

H

Head (Header)

The component of a frame running horizontally at the highest point on the frame. Other horizontal components are transom bars, mullions or sills.

Header, Transom

The horizontal frame member on a transom frame that separates the door area from the transom area above. This is a mullion section with the mullion installed with the mullion insert facing upward instead of downward as in a normal horizontal mullion.

Hinge

An apparatus consisting of two separate leaves joined together used to attach a door to a frame. Numerous types of hinges are used but the most common is the full mortise hinge which mortises into the edge of the door and the rabbet of the frame. Hinges may be made of steel, stainless steel, plated brass, plated bronze or aluminum.

Hinge Emboss

A method of forming a recess in a steel frame which allows a hinge to be installed with its surface in the same plane as the surface of the frame (fully mortised).

Hinge Jamb

The vertical component of a door frame that contains the embossment, preparation, or reinforcement for the hinges that support the door.

Hinge Reinforcement

A steel plate attached to a door frame or a steel door that provides threaded holes for machine screws to attach a hinge to the frame. These may be welded to the frame or mechanically attached. The hinge reinforcement is the primary connection between the door and frame so its integrity is critical to the long-term function of an opening.

Hinge Side

The vertical jamb leg with hinge reinforcements or other hardware preparations to hang the door on the frame.

Hallow Metal Jamb

A steel door frame, usually 16 gauge that uses separate anchors mechanically applied to the frame throat to anchor the jamb to the structure.

Hospital Stop

A special modification to the stop portion of both jambs on a double rabbet frame. The stop is cut off 4″ – 6″ and capped off producing a straight profile at the bottom of the jamb. This straight profile is easier to keep clean than a standard double rabbet frame which has two additional inside corners to trap dirt and other particles.

I

Inactive Door (Inactive Leaf)

In a pair of doors, it is the other door of the pair normally held stationary by surface or flush bolts. The other door is the active door in which the lock or operating hardware is installed.

Inside Dimensions (I.D.)

The measurement between the rabbet surface of two jambs or of a header and sill.

Intertek Testing Services (ITS)

An international testing service that tests, validates, and enforces product labeling procedures for fire resistance, electrical compliance, thermal performance, or other product features that require such certification.

Intermediate Pivot

A piece of hardware used to attach a door to a frame consisting of a large pivot point with bearing surfaces. An intermediate pivot is positioned between the top and bottom pivots on most door openings.

J

Jamb

Another term for door frame.

Jamb Anchor

A formed piece of metal used to attach a hollow metal steel frame to the framing or structure of the wall.

Jamb Depth (Hollow Metal. - Jamb Width, Jamb Thickness)

The overall dimension of the jamb when measured from frame face to frame face. For hollow metal frames, this is usually 1″ larger than the wall since the frame has 1/2″ returns.

Jamb Switch

A mechanical switch mounted on the jamb rabbet connected to a light or sensor used to illuminate a room or closet when the door is in the open position.

K

Kerf

A formed slot or integral pocket in wood or steel frame that accepts the fin of the gasket material allowing it to be installed without screws or adhesives.

Kick Plate

A protective plate mounted to a door to repel the force of carts, gurneys, wheelchairs, or other objects that may impact the door surface.

Knob

A protruding portion of a lock or latch used to operate the latch mechanism. A knob is usually round or oval shape as opposed to a lever handle, another way of operating the lock or latch.

Knocked Down

Refers to a door frame that arrives at the jobsite in pieces and must be assembled at the opening. Other frame options are welded, stick, or pre-hung.

L

Lance

Punch and curl frame to attach Dunbarton casing. When ordering, select “No Lance” for wood casing provided by others.

Latch Jamb (Lock Jamb, Strike Jamb)

The vertical jamb piece that is prepared for a strike to provide secure latching of the door.

Lead Lined

A door or frame that has a protective shield of lead built into its construction for the purpose of reducing radiation penetration.

Leading Edge

The edge of a door that is exposed to view when viewed from the hinge side. Specifically, the leading edge is the strike side edge of a door that opens toward the user.

Leaf (Door)

A term referring to the specific door of a single or pair of doors. For instance, the door with the locking hardware in a pair of doors is the active leaf.

Leaf (Hinge)

The flat part of a hinge that is screwed to the door or frame. A hinge has two leaves joined by a pin through the hinge barrel.

Lever Handle

The portion of a lock or latch that extends from the door surface and is used to retract the latch bolt. A lever is used instead of a knob to facilitate easy operation to comply with ADA requirements.

Lintel

A structural member placed at the head of an opening to provide support and deflect the load to the structure on both sides of the opening. A lintel is most commonly used in masonry construction to support the masonry at the top of a window or door opening.

Lockset

A mechanical device used to secure a door in the closed position. A lock is normally equipped with levers or knobs that operate a latchbolt. To open the door, a key, key card, a combination, or other secure method must be used to operate the lock.

Lock Edge

The edge of a door that contains the lock or latch mechanism, usually opposite the hinge edge.

Lock (Strike) Jamb

The vertical jamb member prepared for a strike for the lock or latch mechanism. If there is no lock or latch, it is the jamb opposite the hinge jamb.

Lock Preparation

The holes, mortises, and tapped screw holes required to install a lock on a door.

Lock Reinforcement

A wood or metal framework concealed in the core of a door to provide support in the lock area to prevent deflection of the door skins when installing the lock or latch.

Louver

A series of slats, blades, or piercings to allow passage of air through an opening.

M

Magnetic Contact

A simple switch that uses two magnets. In most cases, one magnet is in the jamb and contains the low voltage wiring leading to a control station and the other magnet is in the door. When the door is closed, the magnets repel and the switch is opened or closed depending on the desired monitoring position.

Magnetic Holder

An electronically operated electromagnet used to hold a door in the open position. The power is released to the holder in case of fire or a security lock down allowing the door to close.

Magnetic Switch

Same as a magnetic contact.

Masonry

Wall material made from concrete or cinder blocks.

Masonry Anchor

A piece of flat metal or heavy wire that attaches to a masonry frame and extends into the masonry to anchor the frame to the wall.

Masonry Frame

A door frame designed to be easily installed in masonry walls. In most cases, the masonry frame can also be installed in stud and drywall partitions.

Meeting Stile

The area along the vertical edges where two doors hung in pairs meet. This refers to the edges and the surfaces in close proximity to the edges.

Molding

A piece of wood, vinyl, fiberglass, plastic or PVC used to cover joints and/or fasteners or to provide a decorative appearance when applied to flat surfaces.

Mortise Deadlock

A type of lock similar to a mortise lock but containing only a solid deadbolt having no self-latching function.

Mortise Depth

The measurement from the surface to the bottom of a mortise in a door or frame. The mortise depth is the same as the thickness of the hardware to be installed in the mortise.

Mortise Door Bottom

A door bottom that installs into a mortise on the bottom edge of the door so it is concealed when installed.

Mortise - Hinge

The recess in a door or frame that allows the hinge to be installed flush with the surface. The mortise is slightly larger in width and height to allow for easy installation of the hardware.

Mortise - Lock

A type of lock with a large rectangular case that houses the locking and latch retraction mechanisms. This type of lock requires a deep mortise in the door for installation.

Mortise Preparation

A cutout recessed into a door or frame which may include drilling and tapping.

Mortise - Strike

The recess in a door or frame that allows the strike to be installed flush with the surface. The mortise is slightly larger in width and height to allow for easy installation of the strike.

Mullion

The recess in a door or frame that allows the strike to be installed flush with the surface. The mortise is slightly larger in width and height to allow for easy installation of the strike.

Mullion Anchor

A formed or cast piece of metal attached to the structure to provide solid anchorage for a mullion.

Mullion - Horizontal

A mullion section positioned horizontally in a sidelight, transom, or borrowed light frame.

Mullion - Removable

A mullion component used in a pair opening that can be easily removed to allow access to the full width of the opening when necessary. In most cases, the removable mullion is a hardware component and the locking mechanism on the doors is integral with the removable mullion.

Mullion - Strike

A vertical mullion that is prepared for one or more strikes to secure a hinged door at the lock side.

Mullion - Vertical

A mullion section positioned vertically in a sidelight, transom, or borrowed light frame.

Muntin

A component within a window, sidelight or borrowed light that separates panes of glass.

Mute (Silencer)

A piece of rubber or vinyl applied to the stop on a frame to reduce the amount of noise created when closing the door.

N

Narrow Face

In door terminology, this is the face of the door opposite the hinge barrel. When a door is beveled the wide face is the nominal dimension and the narrow face is slightly smaller because beveling removes a small portion of the face.

Narrow Stile

A name for a door having stile widths considerably less than traditional stiles on a wood or metal door. The most common example of a narrow stile door is an aluminum storefront door which has stiles approximately 2″ wide.

Nominal Width

A call-out dimension referring to the size of a component before its final fitting for the unit. For example, a 3′ 0″ door has a nominal dimension of 36″ but the actual measurement of the door after sizing and beveling will be approximately 35 3/4″ which is the actual, no nominal dimension.

Nominal Height

A term used to describe the height of an opening or component when the net size is actually larger or smaller. For instance, a 6′ 8″ frame has a nominal height of 6′ 8″ but the actual door height is less to account for bottom undercut and 1/8” top clearance.

Nominal Size

A term used to describe a dimension of an opening or component when the net size is actually smaller.

Non-Template (Hinge)

A piece of hardware with dimensions and screw locations that are different than industry standards and may vary from one part to another.

No Stop

A jamb material with no stop used as a cased opening or for openings with double-acting doors or openings with no doors.

O

Offset Pivot

A pivot set that has a pivot point extending out from the face of the door in the direction of swing, similar to a hinged door but with a pivot set rather than a pin and barrel.

Outside Dimensions

The measurement from the farthest points in both height and width of an installed, finished unit. For hollow metal frames, it is the outside dimension of the unit. For steel, wood, or other frames using applied casings, it is the overall dimension with the casing applied (tip to tip).

Overhead Stop Header

A mechanical device installed on a door and frame, either mortised or surface mounted, to control the degree of opening of the door. The overhead stop/holder may be configured as a stop only or as a combination stop and hold open device. Overhead stop/holders are used when doors open into a space that has objects that would otherwise be damaged if the door were allowed to swing past a designated degree of opening.

Overhead Stop Concealed

A device installed on a door and frame used to limit the degree of opening for a door. A concealed stop/holder is mortised into both the door and jamb. Both components must be factory prepared for the stop/holder.

P

Pair, Frame

A door frame containing two doors in the same rabbet (plane) opening in the same direction.

Pair, Jambs

A set of 2 jambs for a single or pair frame packed in a single carton.

Panel

A section of a door (steel or wood) installed into a transom or sidelight frame instead of glass or ceramic material.

Parallel Arm Closer

A door closer mounted on the push side of a door with the arm mounted on the stop of the header. In the closed position, the two arm sections are nearly parallel.

Parallel Bevel

For pairs of doors swinging in opposite directions (see “Double Egress”), the doors are beveled to correspond to the swing. Since both doors are on the same hand, the bevels are parallel at the meeting stile.

Pivot

A piece of hardware used to hang a door that is made in two sections. The bottom section contains a cylindrical rod and the top section has a cylindrical hole to fit over the rod. In most cases, the pivot is equipped with some sort of bearing surface. Pivot sets are used on doors with high frequency, doors that are unusually heavy.

Pivot Set

A combination of a top and bottom pivot used to support a door instead of using traditional hinges.

Pivot - Bottom

The bottom assembly of a pivot set used to support the weight of the door. The bottom pivot may install on the floor or be anchored to the jamb.

Pivot – Center – Center Hung

The positioning of a center pivot when it is located in the center of the frame exactly at the mid-point of the header.

Pivot – Center – Edge Hung

The positioning of a center pivot when it is located at the edge of the jamb similar to the location of a single door. The center of the door is normally located 15/16″ from the outside edge of the jamb. The handing of the opening must be specified for edge hung pivots.

Pivot – Intermediate

A piece of pivot hardware installed at an intermediate position on the hinge side used to provide additional support and maintain alignment of the pivot point.

Pivot – Offset

A pivot that installs at the top and/or bottom of a door positioned similar to a hinge and providing a pivot point away from the jamb. The distance from the edge of the jamb to the center of the pivot point is the offset dimension.

Pivot – Top

The upper assembly of a pivot set used to keep the door in a fixed position laterally. The top pivot is installed on the header but may be additionally supported by the jamb.

Pivot – Guard

A light gauge metal box welded to the back of a hollow metal frame over the hardware preps that prevents mortar or plaster from obstructing the mortises and screw holes required for the hardware.

Plinth

A piece of decorative trim (sheet metal) placed at the bottom of the upright jamb to provide a transition between the base molding and jamb molding.

Profile

The shape of a jamb and/or casing when viewed as a cross-section detail. The profile view is used to show how the material is connected to the wall and to verify that the jamb width is compatible with the wall construction.

Profile Molding

A molding or casing with a unique profile instead of straight surfaces.

Push Side

The side of the door opening that clearly shows the hinge barrels or pivots. This means the door will swing toward the operator when opened.

Pocket Door

A door that slides into a recess inside a wall cavity usually hung on rollers from a track at the door head.

Pocket Door Hardware

An assembly of track, rollers, jamb post, guides, and miscellaneous hardware required to create a wall cavity for installation of a sliding pocket door.

Pocket Door Latch/Lock

A piece of hardware installed on a door for use as a lock or latch to secure the door in a closed position. The Pocket Latch/Lock is not usually included in the Pocket Door Hardware kit and must be ordered separately.

Pocket Door Latch/Lock Strike

A piece of hardware installed on a door for use as a lock or latch to secure the door in a closed position. The Pocket Latch/Lock is not usually included in the Pocket Door Hardware kit and must be ordered separately.

Pocket Door Track

The strike plate that is supplied with the Pocket Door Latch/Lock. The strike is attached to the strike jamb of the pocket door trim.

Pocket Door Track

The strike plate that is supplied with the Pocket Door Latch/Lock. The strike is attached to the strike jamb of the pocket door trim.

Pocket Frame

A framework consisting of jamb posts, cross supports, track, and header that installs in a wall prior to application of drywall. This framework creates the pocket for a pocket door.

Pull, Door

A piece of finish hardware applied to a door used to pull the door toward a person attempting to pass through the opening.

Pull Side

The side of the door opening that clearly shows the hinge barrels or pivots. This means the door will swing toward the operator when opened.

Pull Side

The side of the door opening that clearly shows the hinge barrels or pivots. This means the door will swing toward the operator when opened.

R

Rabbet

The flat surface of a door frame that is perpendicular to the wall and not part of the stop of the frame. The rabbet is normally where the door is hung and the hardware preparations occur. On a double rabbet frame, one rabbet contains the door and the other rabbet is left blank. On a double rabbet communicating frame, both rabbets are prepared for doors.

Rabbet - Door

The rabbet area on a frame that contains the door.

Rabbet - Equal

A frame with two rabbets, both the same dimension.

Rabbet - Hinge

The rabbet area on a frame prepared for hinges.

Rabbet - Single

The frame with only one rabbet usually of the correct dimension to install the door.

Rabbet - Unequal

The frame with two rabbets usually of different widths.

Rail

The horizontal member of a stile and rail door (either wood, fiberglass, or metal) is clearly shown as a separate piece. In some cases, the top 6″ and the bottom 12″ of a flush door are referred to as “rails”.

Regular Arm Closer

A door closer mounted on the pull side of the door with the shoe on the arm attached to the header of the frame. When the door is closed, both portions of the arm are perpendicular to the face of the door.

Reinforcement

A piece of solid material used to provide adequate anchorage and screw thread depth for a piece of hardware. Reinforcements are welded, screwed, mechanically attached or adhesive mounted to the frame and/or door.

Reinforcement Bracket

A solid piece of steel or aluminum attached to a frame providing additional depth of steel. The reinforcement is drilled and tapped for the screws being used to apply the hardware to the frame.

Removable Casing

Frame casing that is easily removable without damage and can then be re-installed without impairing function.

Return

The portion of a hollow metal frame perpendicular to the wall that touches the wall when the frame is installed.

Reveal

For millwork, the dimension between the door rabbet and the leading edge of the casing when the opening is viewed perpendicular to the wall.

Removable Mullion

A mullion that is easily removed without affecting the rest of the frame or doors. The most common removable mullion is one used as a stop and latching hardware for a pair of doors equipped with rim exit devices. In normal use, the mullion stays in place and the doors latch to the strikes on the mullion. If the building owner wants to move large objects through the opening, the mullion can be easily removed and replaced with affecting the doors and frame.

Right Side

A description of the positioning of a horizontal or vertical component when viewed with the door swinging away (push side). Right side description could apply to a jamb, vertical casing, a split or spliced header, or a sidelight location on the right side of the assembly when viewed with the door swinging away from the viewer.

Rim Deadlock

A locking device mounted on the surface of the door with a solid bolt that engages a strike mounted on the surface of the frame.

Rim Lock

A locking device mounted on the surface of the door with a latching device that engages a strike mounted on the surface of the frame.

Rough Opening

An opening created in a wall of a structure that requires additional trim, casing, or frames to finish the opening. See Dunbarton’s Rough Opening Guide.

Rubber Silencer

See “Mute“.

S

Sanitary Stop

See “Hospital Stop“.

Rabbet - Door

The rabbet area on a frame that contains the door.

Rabbet - Equal

A frame with two rabbets, both the same dimension.

Rabbet - Hinge

The rabbet area on a frame prepared for hinges.

Rabbet - Single

The frame with only one rabbet usually of the correct dimension to install the door.

Rabbet - Unequal

The frame with two rabbets usually of different widths.

Rail

The horizontal member of a stile and rail door (either wood, fiberglass, or metal) is clearly shown as a separate piece. In some cases, the top 6″ and the bottom 12″ of a flush door are referred to as “rails”.

Regular Arm Closer

A door closer mounted on the pull side of the door with the shoe on the arm attached to the header of the frame. When the door is closed, both portions of the arm are perpendicular to the face of the door.

Reinforcement

A piece of solid material used to provide adequate anchorage and screw thread depth for a piece of hardware. Reinforcements are welded, screwed, mechanically attached or adhesive mounted to the frame and/or door.

Reinforcement Bracket

A solid piece of steel or aluminum attached to a frame providing additional depth of steel. The reinforcement is drilled and tapped for the screws being used to apply the hardware to the frame.

Removable Casing

Frame casing that is easily removable without damage and can then be re-installed without impairing function.

Return

The portion of a hollow metal frame perpendicular to the wall that touches the wall when the frame is installed.

Reveal

For millwork, the dimension between the door rabbet and the leading edge of the casing when the opening is viewed perpendicular to the wall.

Removable Mullion

A mullion that is easily removed without affecting the rest of the frame or doors. The most common removable mullion is one used as a stop and latching hardware for a pair of doors equipped with rim exit devices. In normal use, the mullion stays in place and the doors latch to the strikes on the mullion. If the building owner wants to move large objects through the opening, the mullion can be easily removed and replaced with affecting the doors and frame.

Right Side

A description of the positioning of a horizontal or vertical component when viewed with the door swinging away (push side). Right side description could apply to a jamb, vertical casing, a split or spliced header, or a sidelight location on the right side of the assembly when viewed with the door swinging away from the viewer.

Rim Deadlock

A locking device mounted on the surface of the door with a solid bolt that engages a strike mounted on the surface of the frame.

Rim Lock

A locking device mounted on the surface of the door with a latching device that engages a strike mounted on the surface of the frame.

Rough Opening

An opening created in a wall of a structure that requires additional trim, casing, or frames to finish the opening. See Dunbarton’s Rough Opening Guide.

Rubber Silencer

See “Mute“.

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